Higher Health: Milk drinkers get all the pusy

Kim Kardashian was shocked when she found out the truth about milk

Kim Kardashian was shocked when she found out the truth about milk

BY JUSTIN CHADWICK

Got Milk? Well, if so, you’ve also got plenty of pus.

In my previous post, I ran through the reasons why milk is one of the worst foods you can put into your body. If you want a re-cap, check it out: http://www.ffpress.com.au/blog/higher-health-why-milk-is-a-bone-breaker/.

This time, I want to take you on an adventure to the microscopic level in order to dissect exactly what’s in the milk people drink.

Ron Burgundy doesn't like the taste of pus

Ron Burgundy doesn’t like the taste of pus

I must warn you – it’s not pretty. In fact, it’s a bit gooey. But not the awesome caramel type of gooey. It’s more the yucky gooey that makes you feel all dirty inside.

Ok, so here we go.

First of all, it’s common for cow’s milk to contain measurable levels of herbicides, pesticides, antibiotics and highly toxic dioxins.

And if the cows’ feed is contaminated with either arsenic, cadmium, mercury or lead, a portion of that will also end up in the milk.

All that sucks. But surprisingly, it’s often not enough to turn people off milk. There’s no gross factor to it all … until pus enters the equation.

George Bush was shocked when he found out his milk contained pus. He still drank it anyway ...

George Bush was shocked when he found out his milk contained pus. He still drank it anyway …

Mmmmm, there’s nothing like a bit of pus to kick start the morning, right? All of a sudden, that milk moustache ain’t looking too sexy.

Actually, did it ever look sexy? I always got creeped out by it. Anyways, back to the pus.

What exactly is pus?

Well, to sum it up in a pistachio nutshell, pus is a protein-rich fluid that consists of dead tissue and a build-up of dead white blood cells in the form of neutrophils.

When there is an infection, the body’s immune system orders white blood cells to the area.

After an epic battle between good and bad, the end result is often pus – a large

quantity of dead neutrophils.

Got Milk? The joke is on you buddy!

Got Milk? The joke is on you buddy!

So what does all this have to do with cows?

Well, the life of a dairy cow is a pretty miserable one. They endure annual cycles of artificial insemination, pregnancy and birth, as well mechanised milking almost all year round.

One big consequence of turning cows into milking machines is the increase in infections, usually in the form of mastitis (udder infection).

When the udder becomes infected, pus is inevitable.

To monitor the quality of milk, most countries have set allowable maximums for

Want milk without pus? Switch to delicious almond milk :)

Want milk without pus? Switch to delicious almond milk 🙂

somatic cell counts in milk.

In Australia, this level is generally around 400,000 somatic cells per millilitre. Sometimes, producers are paid a premium price for their milk if their somatic cell count is lower than 250,000/ml.

Now don’t worry, not all these cells are pus. Even healthy milk is made up of somatic cells (predominantly leukocyte white blood cells).

But if an infection is present, then much of the white blood cells are made up of neutrophils, which leads to pusy milk.

Milk producers are meant to avoid using milk from infected cows. But it’s hard to catch infections straight away. In the meantime, pusy milk enters the supply stream, and ends up going down your throat.

Pus cells are a bit like zombies ... they are very hard to kill!!

Pus cells are a bit like zombies … they are very hard to kill!!

And if you think pasteurisation will help, think again.

Pus is already dead. As we’ve all learned from horror movies, it’s very hard to kill something that’s already dead.

Pasteurisation basically just heats up dead white blood cells.

Mmmm, room temperature pus – heated up – then chilled. I can see a restaurant chain opening up. Oh wait, it already has . . . milkshake anyone?

I think I’ll just stick to the coconut milk 😉

Ravo

Go on .... try it!

 

 

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Justin is one of FFPress’ contributors. You can meet the rest of the team [here].

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